wildlife

Nev. county hopes plan prevents sage grouse ESA listing

Posted: Mar 20, 2013

Written by

Martin Griffith, Associated Press

Officials in a rural northeastern Nevada county have approved a pilot project designed to keep sage grouse off the endangered species list by killing ravens with poisoned eggs and by reducing wildfire threats through livestock grazing.

Elko County commissioners say the program set to begin on the 15,000-acre Devils Gate Ranch is needed because wildfires and ravens pose the biggest threat to the imperiled chicken-sized bird. They say fires destroy sagebrush the birds rely on, while ravens are by far its most common predator.

VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE




Utah public lands legislation puts federal control in cross hairs

Posted: Mar 20, 2013

Written by

Brian Maffly, Salt Lake Tribune

The anti-federal theme that characterized much of the 2013 session reached far into the natural resources arena. The Legislature passed several bills and resolutions affirming state and local "sovereignty" over public lands, forests, water rights, endangered species and law enforcement.

VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE




Green group's standing questioned as justices review USFS NEPA case

Posted: Mar 18, 2013

Written by

Jeremy P. Jacobs, Greenwire

The Supreme Court agreed today to review the standing of an environmental group challenging a Forest Service management plan for the Sierra Nevada.

At issue is a 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruling for the Pacific Rivers Council that invalidated a regional management plan for 11 national forests covering 11.5 million acres.

The council successfully argued in appeals court that the Forest Service's 2004 revised environmental impact statement and framework failed to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act for assessing potential damage to fish species.



Enviro groups to sue Interior over dunes lizard decision

Posted: Mar 18, 2013

Written by

Phil Taylor, E&E

Two environmental groups said they plan to sue the Interior Department over its decision last summer to withdraw a proposal to list the dunes sagebrush lizard as an endangered species, arguing that too little was known about how landowners planned to protect its habitat.

The Center for Biological Diversity and Defenders of Wildlife said the Fish and Wildlife Service wrongly assumed that a Texas plan would protect the reptile's shinnery oak dune habitat, even though it had never seen the specific conservation steps landowners had committed to take.



Mont. senators pushing for Keystone XL approval

Posted: Mar 18, 2013

Written by

Malia Rulon Herman, Great Falls Tribune

Montana Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester continued pressing for approval of the Keystone XL Pipeline on Thursday with a bipartisan bill that would let Congress bypass the president and approve the long-delayed project.

The legislation comes two months after Nebraska opted to let the project traverse the state and the same month the State Department issued an environmental assessment saying the pipeline would not cause environmental harm.

VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE




Delay in lynx recovery plan spurs federal lawsuit

Posted: Mar 18, 2013

Written by

Matthew Brown, Associated Press

Thirteen years after the government listed Canada lynx as a threatened species, wildlife advocates on Thursday asked a federal judge to force the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to finish its long-awaited recovery plan for the snow-loving wild cats.

Four groups represented by the Western Environmental Law Center allege the long delay on the part of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service violates federal law.

VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE




Judge denies industry appeal on oil and gas leases in Wyo, Utah

Posted: Mar 15, 2013

Written by

Adam Voge, Casper Star-Tribune

A federal appeals court on Tuesday blocked an industry effort to release federal oil and gas leases in two western states.

The decision affirmed a 2011 court decision that backed a Department of Interior order not to issue 118 oil and gas leases in Wyoming and Utah, citing possible effects on wilderness areas and wildlife habitats.

Energy producers sued the department over the order, and several conservation groups such as the Wyoming Outdoor Council, Biodiversity Conservation Alliance, Greater Yellowstone Coalition and National Wildlife Fund intervened.

VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE




More groups join legal fight over Wyo. wolf delisting

Posted: Mar 14, 2013

Written by

Associated Press/GW

As the battle over protections for wolves in Wyoming continues, more groups who want the state to take over management of the animals have entered the legal fray.

U.S. District Judge Alan Johnson has allowed the Wyoming Wolf Coalition, made up of county governments and sportsmen groups, to intervene in a lawsuit filed by eight environmental groups against the state of Wyoming and the Fish and Wildlife Service. Currently, Wyoming is the only state in the northern Rocky Mountain region involved in litigation over wolf delisting.



NPS to leave open 900 full-time job slots, 1,000 seasonal positions

Posted: Mar 13, 2013

Written by

John McArdle, E&E

National Park Service Director Jon Jarvis offered the most detailed account to date of how sequestration funding cuts are affecting the agency in a letter to his employees Friday that at times struck an almost apologetic tone.

To meet funding reductions, Jarvis wrote, 900 permanent positions won't be filled and 1,000 fewer seasonal employees will be hired this year. Meanwhile, he said, there will be "limited" furloughs, specifically in the ranks of the U.S. Park Police.



Tribes, wildlife advocates rally for bison

Posted: Mar 13, 2013

Written by

LAURA LUNDQUIST, Bozeman Daily Chronicle

Kill the bills, not the buffalo.

That was the message of many Native American leaders who spoke at the Rally for the Future of Montana’s Buffalo, held Tuesday in the Capitol rotunda.

During this session, legislators have proposed a dozen bills that would affect bison in varying degrees, from allowing people to shoot them on sight if they stepped outside Yellowstone National Park to allowing wardens to tell hunters the location of bison. Only five bills remain alive, but Montana’s tribal councils said that’s still too many.

VIEW ORIGINAL ARTICLE




Syndicate content
Copyright © 2017 Red Lodge Clearinghouse. All rights reserved.